Welcome to my Blog

Gill Rose

Sport and Remedial Massage and Soft Tissue Therapy

 

How can Manual Lymphatic Drainage help you this holiday season?

Yes. Sun, heat and holidays are here and let’s face it, who doesn’t want to enjoy it as much as possible?! But the warm weather and travel can play havoc with our bodies, from dry skin and frizzy hair to puffy ankles and eyes.  And how about that puffiness we can all experience on long haul flights, not to mention the sluggish lymphatic system generally from sitting for so long!  Now whilst I can’t pretend to have the answer for frizzy hair I can help with the rest! So what does the lymphatic system do? Our lymphatic system supports your circulatory system and is responsible for removing excess fluid from the body’s tissues, filtering it in the lymph nodes then returning the “clean” fluid back to the circulatory system.  In this way it helps to maintain blood volume, blood pressure and prevent oedema (that puffiness we are talking about).  This lymph contains dead cells, waste products, bacteria and viruses which would otherwise be harmful to our bodies if not filtered. How does the lymph flow? The lymphatic system doesn’t have a big heart (sorry!) to pump the lymph around the body like the circulatory system has for the blood.  Due to this lack of a pump lymph flow is assisted by the pressure exerted by the compression of skeletal muscles.  This is why movement and exercise are so important to keep the lymphatic system working well. Respiration is also important as it creates pressure changes in the thorax and a suction effect, enabling more lymph to drain back into the circulatory system.  This is why movement, exercise and breathing...

Stuck with nagging shoulder pain?

Did you know that once you have had an episode of shoulder pain 40-50% of people will continue to have some symptoms 12 months down the line, even if it doesn’t stop them doing things? But rehab can be very simple and the earlier you start doing something about it the less time it will take to recover. So what generally goes wrong with the shoulder? Most shoulder issues are down to the rotator cuff not doing its job properly.  The rotator cuff is made up of four muscles that encompass the glenohumeral (shoulder) joint – the Supraspinatus, Teres Minor, Infraspinatus and the Subscapularis.  Together they provide stability for the joint when we move our arm.  So, just prior to moving our arm the brain sends an automatic message to the rotator cuff to say there is an intention to move.  The cuff then switches on (minus the subscapularis). One part of the cuff will then work harder than the other depending on what action I make e.g. when I take my arm forwards and up my deltoids and pectoral muscles are moving my arm so the muscles at the back of the shoulder need to work hard.  If I take my arm backwards the muscle at the front of the shoulder has to work harder i.e. your subscapularis. So the cuff is providing the torque or movement muscles with stability.  There are situations e.g. when you arm is at shoulder height and you rotate your shoulder, when your cuff has more of a role as torque muscles and other muscles i.e. your deltoids and lats. are working more...

Mothering Sunday 26th March!

Forget the flowers and chocolate (sooo predictable!). Why not buy your lovely mum a 1 hour Manual Lymphatic Drainage treatment for Mothers Day and really make her smile. Great for the skin, tired puffy eyes and ankles and a fabulous detox, and great for boosting energy levels and the immune system.  AND everyone who has had a treatment has said how it is soooooo relaxing, especially when we include the face and head.  I so wish I could treat myself with this one!! Call me, text me or email me for further details: 07786 323818 gillrosemassage@gmail.com   Please share if you enjoyed this...

Lower back pain and sciatica

This one is for anyone who suffers with lower back pain and/or sciatica…… NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) have updated their guidelines for practitioners (including your GP) on assessing and treating lower back pain and sciatica, including the section on non-invasive treatments.  It includes the following guidance: Providing “information on the nature of low back pain and sciatica” and “encouragement to continue with normal activities” Considering “a group exercise programme (biomechanical, aerobic, mind–body or a combination of approaches) within the NHS for people with a specific episode or flare-up of low back pain with or without sciatica” Considering “manual therapy (spinal manipulation, mobilisation or soft tissue techniques such as massage) for managing low back pain with or without sciatica, but only as part of a treatment package including exercise, with or without psychological therapy” Considering “psychological therapies using a cognitive behavioural approach for managing low back pain with or without sciatica but only as part of a treatment package including exercise, with or without manual therapy…” Promoting and facilitating “return to work or normal activities of daily living for people with low back pain with or without sciatica” Take the knowledge of that guidance with you when you see your GP and book a deep tissue massage with me 07786 323818.  I combine soft tissue manipulation with advice on simple exercises to suit your specific back issue. For the full guidance go to https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/NG59 The aim of NICE is “Improving health and social care through evidence-based guidance” Please share if you enjoyed this...

How can Manual Lymphatic Drainage help you fight potential cold and flu bugs and avoid the misery of sinus pain?

At this time of year there are lots of cold and flu bugs around and with most of us working in close proximity to others or sharing the bugs that our children bring home to us, it seems nothing short of a miracle if we manage to avoid them! Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD) boosts the immune system and therefore anyone who suffers repeatedly from cold and flu viruses can benefit from regular MLD.  It has been shown that an increase in lymph flow stimulates production of lymphocytes which enhances immune function. In addition, a regular 40 minute treatment focused mostly on the head and face can really help to unblock and drain away the sinuses in those people who suffer with sinus problems on a regular basis or as part of a cold virus. Having blocked sinuses can be miserable, with pressure, congestion, headaches, eye ache, ear ache and face ache all contributing to the misery!  It also makes us feel very tired and run down.  MLD helps to drain the sinuses and alleviate built up pressure in the face and around the eyes and ears, while also boosting the immune system and allowing your body to do what it does naturally to heal. Studies have revealed that most antibiotics and topical nasal steroid sprays prescribed for people with sinusitis show no clinical useful effect (Journal of American Medical Association Vol.298 No.21, December 5, 2007 :2487-2496) To book a treatment and give your immune system the boost it needs call me on 07786 323818 or email me at gillrosemassage@gmail.com   Please share if you enjoyed this...

How can Manual Lymphatic Drainage help your skin at this time of year?

Are you someone whose skin hates the winter months? Many of us find that our skin struggles with the cold weather and central heating and, as we are constantly going from warm houses to the icy cold outdoors, our skin suffers.  For me it shows itself in dry cheeks and hands, the latter not helped by my hands being in and out of water during the day.  Others find their complexion changes and their skin looks and feels dull and lifeless.  Or skin feels irritated and sore. If this is you Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD) can help. How does it help our skin? Lymph vessels make an intricate meshwork that covers every inch of our skin, and surrounds each organ.  Much of the superficial lymphatic system lies in and just under the skin, bringing nutrients to the tissues and taking away toxins and waste to be neutralised in the lymph nodes. MLD stimulates your lymphatic system, gently stretching the walls of the lymph vessels and encouraging lymph drainage, helping it to do its job more effectively, removing waste and excess stagnant tissue fluid, eliminating toxins, clearing blockages, boosting your immune system and allowing those all important nutrients to be transported to the cells more quickly.  By performing Manual Lymphatic Drainage we can increase the volume of lymph flow by as much as 20 times. Enhancing the quality of the skin Estheticians have been using lymphatic drainage for years to enhance the quality of the skin, especially on the face. When the lymph is flowing, the cells are being bathed in fresh fluid which contains lots of nutrients which causes...

More about Manual Lymphatic Drainage

How does Manual Lymphatic Drainage work? Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD) is a very gentle treatment. It uses light pressure and slow rhythmic movements in sequences to stimulate the lymphatic system.  This encourages the flow of lymph through the body and moves fluid away from any area that is not working properly to an area that is working. In the case of lymphoedema, a swelling that develops as a result of an impaired lymphatic system, MLD is used to move the fluid to an area that is working normally.  In order to re route the flow of the lymph fluid we firstly need to work on the area that the lymph will be re routed to.  This clears the area before then proceeding to work on the area of lymphoedema.  Hence we generally start the treatment at the neck and chest. How could it benefit me or someone I know? MLD is recognised as the best treatment for primary and secondary lymphoedema, and any kind of puffiness caused by water retention, poor circulation or pregnancy. MLD boosts the immune system so is great for people that suffer regularly from colds and viruses and sinusitis.  It is also good for people who cannot move much as their lymphatic system will be sluggish. MLD can have a positive effect on problem skin, cellulite and stretch marks.  It can improve energy levels and general feelings of health and wellbeing if you are feeling run down or low in energy. It can also be used as part of a detox.  MLD is deeply relaxing and can also help with pain from fractures, sprains and...

Say hello to the lymphatic system

I have now started taking bookings for Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD) so I thought it might be useful to write a short blog introducing the lymphatic system before introducing Manual Lymphatic Drainage.  If you can’t wait then click on the Manual Lymphatic Drainage tab at the top of this website for more information. What is the lymphatic system? The lymphatic system is a one way drainage system that removes excess fluid from the body’s tissues, maintaining the balance of fluid in the body. It returns the fluid to the circulatory system once it has been filtered, making it an important part of the body’s immune response. The lymphatic system is closely related to the circulatory system. However, instead of the blood being pumped around the body by the heart, lymph (fluid) is pumped around the body by muscle contraction and gravity. This lymph contains a high number of a type of white blood cell called lymphocytes that fight infection and destroy damaged or abnormal cells. How does the lymphatic system work? The lymph seeps into the body’s tissues from the blood vessels around the body.  The lymphatic system takes up this fluid and transports it through a system of lymphatic vessels and nodes.  The lymph carries nutrients to the tissues and carries away waste products, bacteria, disease, toxins and bad cells. The fluid, or lymph, travels through the lymphatic vessels one way, valves stop it going backwards. These connect to groups of lymph nodes such as under your arm pits, in your groin and in your neck.  The lymph nodes are filters, a bit like a water filter.  They...

Shoulder stability

Why is shoulder stability so crucial?  I often talk to my clients about the need for their shoulder blades (scapulas) to be in the correct position, moving freely, that is, not “stuck” but also stable.  But why is this important? The main muscles that stabilize your scapula are the Serratus Anterior, Rhomboids, Trapezius and Levator Scapula.   The scapula is able to achieve a great range of movement – elevation and depession, adduction and abduction, protraction and retraction, and upward and downward rotation. The rotator cuff muscles attach to various parts of the scapula at one end and the top of the bone of the upper arm (humerus) at the other.  They encompass and stabilize the glenohumeral joint (where the top of your humerus sits in the socket).  The rotator cuff muscles work together as a unit to hold the top of the humerus stable in the socket as you move your arm. However, when the scapula is not stable this impacts on the position of the socket, the rotator cuff muscles and the postion of the head of your humerus in the shoulder socket.  This can cause pain, tendonopathy or impingement.  It can also limit your range of movement in your shoulder.  The pain can travel down your arm, up into your neck or into your upper back and posterior shoulders. So, good shoulder stability, with all the muscles working in harmony, is essential to full pain free functioning of your shoulder. Deep tissue massage and soft tissue therapy can start to address some of the imbalances in the soft tissues that lead to shoulder pain.  If this...

The Best Mattress for your Back

How many of you wake up in the morning feeling like someone has punched you all over, or stiff as a board and unable to move freely for the first half hour after getting out of your cosy cocoon?  I see a surprising number of people who experience some quite debilitating aches and pains after what should be a restful and rejuvinating nights sleep. Now there are many and varied reasons for why someone might wake up in the morning or the middle of the night with specific aches and pains and not all are related to the bed that you are sleeping in.  But if you find you can’t get comfortable at night or constantly wake up with non specific aches and pains in your back, shoulders, neck, hips or just generally all over, consider these questions: 1) When did you last change your mattress?  If it’s more than 10 years ago it may be time to buy a new one 2) Does your mattress sag in the middle, perhaps causing you to roll towards the middle if you share your bed? Or does it sag at any point along the length of your body?  Lie on your bed on your side and ask someone to look and tell you if your spine is in its normal alignment (see image above) 3) Can you feel hard springs digging into your body?  Or lumpy bits in the mattress beneath you? So what is the best mattress for your back? Well it would seem that this is as individual and varied as we all are.  What will be good for...

So you thought breathing was natural?

Well to babies it is, but to many of us it is not. Many of us rely on breathing from our chest and as a consequence don’t get enough air into our lungs and oxygen into our bodies and suffer with pain caused by overusing certain muscles of the neck such as your scalenes. Practice diaghragmatic breathing: lay on your back with a small pillow or block under your head. Place one hand on your chest and one on your belly. On an in breath allow the abdominals to relax and let your belly fill with air. As you breath out, fully expel all the air. Breathe in through the nose and out through the mouth. If you are doing it right the hand on your chest shouldn’t be moving much at all but your other hand will be moving as you expand your belly. The benefits! More efficient oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, more oxygen means more energy. It also reduces your blood pressure, helps you relax, increases your endorphins (helping with pain relief), increases circulation, improves digestion, improves performance in sports and gives the muscles in your neck some time off.   Please share if you enjoyed this...

Official launch of the new website!

The new website for Gill Rose Sport and Remedial Massage and Soft Tissue Therapy has been launched this week! The cleaner, fresher and more modern look has been complimented by a brand new logo! There is some general information about how massage can help you and the cost of treatment on the “Why Massage?” page and some more detailed information about some of the conditions sport and remedial massage is particularly good for on the “How can massage help you?” page. I am loving the “You say….” page where you will find lots of feedback from people who have used my services; many thanks to all of you who contributed to that page. And last but not least, there is a new addition to the website – my blog! This is where I hope to be able to share information with you that you will hopefully find useful and interesting (and possibly even life changing!), so please keep popping back to see what’s happening and share on Facebook, Linked In and Twitter if you like what you read. And let me know what you think of the new website by submitting a comment below. And finally, a very big thank you to Rachel Clarke of MoreLime for working with me to create such a great looking website. I would recommend Rachel to anyone wanting to create a website for their small business or give an existing website a great facelift!   Please share if you enjoyed this...

6 ways to get your feet and ankles moving better

Wrap a flex band or towel round the bottom of your foot/instep and with your leg straight pull your foot towards you to stretch your calf. Turn your foot inwards and outwards and feel where the you get the best stretch. Then try it with your knee slightly flexed Whilst in the stretch position above alternate between pulling one side of the band then the other in a gliding motion side to side. Repeat this with your knee slightly flexed Try spreading your toes then placing them on the floor Pull your toes up towards you then curl them into the floor Make circular movements with your feet alternating direction. Try drawing the alphabet in the air! Pull your toes and foot up towards you with your hand so you feel a stretch in the bottom of your foot Please share if you enjoyed this...

Massage eases low back pain

A randomized controlled trial published in the Annals of Internal Medicine 5 July 2011 has found that massage helps people with back pain to function better even after six months (ScienceDaily).  “We found the benefits of massage are about as strong as those reported for other effective treatments: medications, acupuncture, exercise, and yoga,” says trial leader Dr. Daniel C Cherkin, PHD,  a senior investigator at Group Health Research Institute. “And massage is at least as safe as other treatment options. So people who have persistent back pain may want to consider massage as an option.” After 10 weeks “Patients in the massage groups spent fewer days in bed, were more active, and used less anti-inflammatory medication than did those with usual care”. To read the full article click here.   Please share if you enjoyed this...